Offshore Outsourcing & Scammer
Blog about offshore outsourcing and scammer in the outsourcing industry
Avoiding getting scammed - make a background check
by Rudolf Faix Sunday, February 8, 2015 6:11 AM

Where ever business is done, fraudsters are not far away. You’ll get scammed if you have to trust to someone met over the internet.  Make in each case a background check of your future business partner.

If you get the offer by using a professional membership site like LinkedIn and the profile has no picture from a real person uploaded then forget the offer. You even need not continue using this script. The possibility that you got the offer from a scammer is in this case already 99%. Only scammers are in need to hide themselves in the anonymity of the Internet.

Start with the picture search if a picture of your business partner is provided. It is easy if you are using Google Chrome for browsing.  Put your mouse pointer over their profile picture and by doing a right click chose “Search Google for this image”.  If you don’t have this option then you can save the image at your local hard disk (right click at the image and chose “Save image as..” from the context menu). Afterwards you go open http://images.google.com, click at the camera symbol and upload your picture. Google is able to take a picture from an url too, but it has no access to some membership sites.

Don’t let yourself get fooled from the result set, because you will also get the same picture with the name from their followers on the social networks and even from similar pictures (googles computers are thinking that the picture is looking similar).

Try to find negative comments and the use of different names in the profile on other sites used for the person shown at the picture.  Most of the scammers are using pictures found at the internet, which are showing important persons or celebrities.

If your search has been negative until now, then continue with the real domain name of your business partner. Use the email domain or the link, which they have sent you. Use http://www.scamadviser.com for checking their domain reputation.  If the given postal contact address is not matching with the registered domain name or they are using an anonymizing service for the domain name, then your business partner has something to hide. Real companies are proud about their products and their name is their trademark. For this they will not hide themselves in the anonymity of the Internet. Only scammers are hiding themselves.

Locate the place or the area of the world from where they have sent you an email. For this you need to consult the documentation of your email client or you use Google to find out the way how to get the Internet email headers for your email client. In the Internet email headers is the way described which the email has taken. Simple copy the Internet email headers into the form shown at the free online tool found at http://mxtoolbox.com/EmailHeaders.aspx. You get a route list, which the email has taken on it way with the ip addresses.

You can check the location of this ip addresses by using the free site http://www.iplocation.net/. The location shall match the promoted location and country of your communication partner. Be aware, that the location can be the next larger city next to the address of your communication partner.

If you have did not find something negative about your new business partner, then you should continue with using Google search.

Google has few search options, which can help you to find something out about your new business partner. This search will take a lot more time. Search for the name of your business partner, the name of his company in all possible combinations.

Search with an exact phrase:
Put quotation marks around words "[any word]" to search for an exact phrase in an exact order. Keep in mind that searching with quotes might exclude relevant results. For instance, a search for "Alexander Bell" will miss pages that refer to Alexander G. Bell.

I use this function for searching names and domain names of my business partner. Especially by searching a specific domain name is it very helpful. Scammer sites are getting very fast documented by others and you are able to review their comments.

Search within a specific site:
Precede your query with site: if you know you want your answer from within a specific site or type of site (.org, .edu). For example: site:edu or site:nytimes.com.

As you can search inside a specific site, you can exclude specific sites, by excluding them. To exclude them from the result set you need only put a dash in front. Example -site:linkedin.com for not listing all the contacts from LinkedIn

Find related pages:

Use the related: operator to find pages that have similar content by typing related: followed by the website address. For instance, if you find a website you like, try using related:[insert URL] to locate similar websites.

In any case, even if you did not find out something bad about your new business partner, you should take the lowest possible risk for making business. Sorry, but a perfect instruction for not getting scammed is not available. Think every time that even companies cannot give you money for doing nothing. Every offer, which seems too good to be true, is only scam. So don't turn off your brain if you get a very good offer. Don’t get greedy. One side wins in each in each business, which is done. It is the seller - otherwise he would not sell it.

Other Fraud Warning Sites

A list of proved scammer can get found in the menu entry Scammer Exposed.

Offers from trusted and validated brokers can get found in the menu entry Fair Campaign Offers.


 

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Defense

The SCAM with the “Security deposit”
by Rudolf Faix Friday, February 6, 2015 8:07 AM

Call centers be aware from the “refundable” security deposit. All this offers are nothing else then SCAM. In the normal world a security deposit is given to this one, which gives a value, which cannot get retrieved fast (in leasing, rentals, etc.).

In the case of call center work the given value is the phone bill and the work of the agents, which cannot get retrieved. For this you are able to ask for a security deposit. Especially if the agreed billing period is longer than 1 week you should ask for a security deposit.

A security deposit should include the agreed counts of agents * hours of work during the agreed working time * hourly base + any payment for the broker! A security deposit can be done by an irrevocable bank guarantee, which needs to get accepted at your bank. Don’t start working if your bank does not accept the given bank guarantee. In this case you’ll never see your money.

Call center friends, don't get scammed, a contract should be only valid if you get your security deposit paid.

 

Definition of a security deposit from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_deposit):

A security deposit is a sum of money held in trust either as an initial part-payment in a purchasing process (often used to prevent the seller selling an item to someone else during an agreed period of time while the buyer verifies the suitability of the item, or arranges finance) - also known as an earnest payment, or else, in the course of a rental agreement to ensure the cost of repair in relation to any damage explicitly specified in the lease and that did in fact occur.

In certain taxation regimes a deposit need not declared as part of the gross income of the receiving party (person or corporation) until either the depositing party or an arbitrator agrees the funds may be used for the intended purpose.

A 1990 United States of America ruling[1] provides that a deposit differs from an advance payment because the depositing party has dominion over the funds and retains the right to insist upon repayment in cash. On the other hand, the party making an advance payment retains no right to insist upon the return of the funds as long as the recipient fulfills the contractual agreement.

The rationale behind the court’s decision is that the recipient of the deposit does not enjoy - complete dominion - over the funds and is subject to an express obligation to repay so long as the customer fulfills his or her legal obligations. Additionally, both the timing and the method of refund are largely within the control of the depositing party, as he or she can choose to insist upon repayment in cash or apply the deposit to purchase services. The recipient’s right to retain the funds of the deposit is contingent upon events that are outside of his or her control.

An important note is that although the recipient may receive an economic benefit from the deposits - i.e. interest - the prospect that income will be generated provides no ground for taxing the principal. However, any income that the recipient may earn through the use of the deposit money is, of course, taxable.

 

In leasing

Security deposits are required most often by lessors of automobiles, apartments, and commercial real estate.

The security deposits required by many residential landlords of their tenants are the source of much dispute and litigation. Many states and municipalities have enacted laws that specifically regulate the landlord's ability to withhold tenant security deposits after a tenant moves out. Some states and cities require that interest be paid to the tenant as it is earned on the security deposit.

In some legal regimes the deposit has to be placed with an independent escrow agent or licensed deposit taker such as a bank so that the risk of fraud is reduced and the funds earn interest at a fair market rate.

In the United States of America, Washington DC, Alaska, Illinois, and Wisconsin have notably more tenant-friendly legislation in place than states like Indiana or Michigan, for example. The cities of Madison, Wisconsin and Chicago, Illinois have in place substantially greater protection of tenants' security deposit rights than the surrounding areas.

 

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Fraud and Scam

Spam and scam with "FREE" eBooks
by Rudolf Faix Thursday, February 5, 2015 8:50 AM

The most of this “FREE” eBooks are not really free. You have at least to drop your email address and mostly some more information about yourself. In the best case you get some usable information from the eBook, which is belonging to the general knowledge. In the most cases you only get a promotion for any other services or the eBook ends where it is coming interesting. There you find a link for continuing reading. If you click the link, you’ll end up at a pay site.

The result will be in any case that you get flooded with spam, because your data get traded together with the topic of the eBook. For this reason the scammer will know already in what you are interested. As more information you need to enter as higher will be the earning for your information.

So don’t forget, nothing is for FREE at the world. You have to pay with your personal data. This data are getting used to spam you and this data are getting sold. For this be AWARE from FREE eBooks. You pay in any way with your personal data for information, which you can get free from the Internet if you know how to use some search engines.

If something is free, then it will be written on a web site or it will be downloadable without any registration.

A few days ago one LinkedIn member even tried to earn money by using ad.fly for a self-compiled list of scammer. The greediness is endless from some people.

 

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Fraud and Scam

Beginners guide for Call Center
by Rudolf Faix Saturday, January 31, 2015 3:07 PM

Brokers and people, who are calling themselves to be “Consultants”, try to sell something to you. For this they are promoting their campaigns.

I think everybody knows already what promotion is and that promotion tries to make something better than it is and hiding the vulnerabilities. Good marketers are even able to make from the vulnerabilities of the product to an advantage for their victims (buyer).

If you are a newcomer, then think about my words and read the offers from campaigns with the critical eye of a consumer and think about it, that you are reading only a promotion. With the help of telemarketing mostly low quality products are getting sold for an exorbitant price. Good and usable products are getting sold inside of shops.

  • Campaigns which are sounding too good to be true are SCAM.
    Don’t look only at the money, which is promised. Think about it, that you cannot get more commission than a percentage of the sales price.

  • As higher the proposed winnings per sale are, as harder will it be to sell the product. Nobody pays more than it is seems to be necessary for him.

  • A serious company will give you all the necessary information and arguments, for selling their products. Compare their products with similar products for getting more information what are you selling and about the competitors.

  • A serious company will provide you data for calling. They are able to make a better selection for their future customers then you. Data from other call centers are already many times used and for this it will be harder to sell something.

  • Make a test drive by speaking with some people of the target customer base, if such a product is interesting for them and how high they would rate the proposed product.

  • If you after all this unsure about the product, than offer only an hourly billing to the broker or consultant.

  • Ask if you get a phone number provided by your customer, which you can use as caller id.

  • Don’t register a phone number by yourself, because in this case you are getting the fraud complains and the fines from the telecom regulatory, for which is your customer responsible. You are working only for him. Fees from the local telecom regulatory can get executed internationally.

  • If you shall make anonymous calls, then you would very seldom reach somebody. Very much people are not answering anonymous calls by suppressing even from ringing of their phones.

Don’t forget that you are doing the work and you should get paid for it. Don’t pay anything that you can get a contract. Contracts, which should be international valid, need to get signed in front of a notary and need to get legalized by the government of the involved countries. This procedure is not really cheap, but it is necessary in the case of a fail and one party likes to bring the other one in front of the law court. International contracts, without a confirmation of a notary and without legalizing them, have no value. The legalization process only confirms that the document has been signed in front of a legal and public notary. The last instance for legalizing a document is the ministry for foreign affairs. Your rights cannot get executed in another country without all the confirmation of the ministry for foreign affairs all involved countries.

 

How to identify scammer by using free tools

 

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Call Center

The SCAM with the consultant fee
by Rudolf Faix Saturday, January 31, 2015 2:40 PM

If a consultant has a contract with a client, the consultant has to protect the interests of its customer. It means on the other site round if a consultant makes a contract with you, then he has to protect your interests.

If one of the two parties fails or have different interpretations in a process, the consultant will be responsible and liable. A consultant, who is working for both parties, can run very easily into a conflict of the interests. Therefore is it not possible for him to take care of the interests of both parties. For this he can be only a consultant for one party or an address broker. The prices for addresses are much lower than for a consulting.

The logical result of such advertising: A consultant or broker certifies with it, that he has no contract with his “client”. If he additional hides his identity, then you know already why. Each normal and logical thinking person will identify his advertising here as a scam.

How to identify scammer by using free tools

 

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Fraud and Scam

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AboutMe

I'm since more then 35 years in the computer business (programming and technical support) and using the Internet since it has started. Since 2002 I'm programming solutions for Asterisk and since 2004 I'm in the call center industry.

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