Offshore Outsourcing & Scammer
Blog about offshore outsourcing and scammer in the outsourcing industry
Tech Support Scam - Scamming the Scammers
by Rudolf Faix Monday, January 11, 2016 9:42 AM

Tech Support ScamTechnical support tricks are, sadly, a to a great degree regular scourge. Most such tricks are what might as well be called rebel antivirus assaults, which attempt to terrify shoppers into buying useless security software. Both sorts of tricks attempt to make the shopper trust that the guest is by one means or another connected with Microsoft or with a security organization, and every guest tries to persuade or alarm the buyer into surrendering control over his or her PC.

At YouTube are getting already more than 18,000 videos and recordings of tech support scams found. Google also provides 445,000 hits for the exact phrase "Tech Support Scam". For this reason is my sympathy on behalf of defrauded Call Centers in very limited - pity is from my site not available in this case.

An very good example is given by the video "Scamming the Scammers - How to Handle Fake Tech Support Calls" from the user CareyHolzman with more than 360,000 views:

Another nice video with the title "SCAMMER CALLS PRANKSTER - Microsoft Tech Support Scam" from PettyPranks has already more than 825,000 views:

In the video "Microsoft or tech support scam - Locating the scammers" from Jim Browning with more than 440,000 views is the scammer the Ariba Call Center Private Limited from Kolkota, India calling:

The domain registration data from aribacallcenter.in:

Domain ID:D5907184-AFIN
Domain Name:ARIBACALLCENTER.IN
Created On:27-Feb-2012 05:54:23 UTC
Last Updated On:27-Mar-2015 01:11:19 UTC
Expiration Date:27-Feb-2016 05:54:23 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:Webiq Domains Solutions Pvt. Ltd. (R131-AFIN)
Status:CLIENT TRANSFER PROHIBITED
Registrant ID:DI_9175366
Registrant Name:ajitesh banerjee
Registrant Organization:wishnet
Registrant Street1:1/132 M M Ghosh Road
Registrant Street2:
Registrant Street3:
Registrant City:Kolkata
Registrant State/Province:West Bengal
Registrant Postal Code:700074
Registrant Country:IN
Registrant Phone:+91.3325515940
Registrant Phone Ext.:
Registrant FAX:
Registrant FAX Ext.:
Registrant Email:soumennew@gmail.com
Admin ID:DI_9175366
Admin Name:ajitesh banerjee
Admin Organization:wishnet
Admin Street1:1/132 M M Ghosh Road
Admin Street2:
Admin Street3:
Admin City:Kolkata
Admin State/Province:West Bengal
Admin Postal Code:700074
Admin Country:IN
Admin Phone:+91.3325515940
Admin Phone Ext.:
Admin FAX:
Admin FAX Ext.:
Admin Email:soumennew@gmail.com
Tech ID:DI_9175366
Tech Name:ajitesh banerjee
Tech Organization:wishnet
Tech Street1:1/132 M M Ghosh Road
Tech Street2:
Tech Street3:
Tech City:Kolkata
Tech State/Province:West Bengal
Tech Postal Code:700074
Tech Country:IN
Tech Phone:+91.3325515940
Tech Phone Ext.:
Tech FAX:
Tech FAX Ext.:
Tech Email:soumennew@gmail.com
Name Server:DNS1.COOLKATA.BIZ
Name Server:DNS2.COOLKATA.BIZ
Name Server:DNS3.COOLKATA.BIZ
Name Server:DNS4.COOLKATA.BIZ
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
DNSSEC:Unsigned

By the large count of videos found at YouTube and search results in Google everybody can see how risky the tech support scam is. With small and easy tools can get the source of the call and the remote access to the victims computer located.

On the other site is the problem that with the amount of scam is India losing their remaining reputation. I think that it would not last long until an example is set for this amount of scam coming from there. Real companies are already not able to make some legal business because nobody trust them for the amount of scammers coming from their country.

Opposite round is everybody guilty by himself if he get scammed from someone located in India. A simple Google search and everybody can find out from where the most of the scam is coming from.

 

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Fraud and Scam

Important information about non-voice processes (form filling, backoffice, etc.) and inbound campaigns
by Rudolf Faix Sunday, November 29, 2015 9:01 AM

For all, which are still searching for non-voice processes and don't believe that there are no form-filling processes or backoffice work available, I like to give you an actual example for the reason why there are such processes available. The following text is a translation from a press release distributed by the dpa (German Press Agency):

In the so-called "Swissleaks" affair, where client data from the HSBC Private Bank in Geneva got forwarded to authorities from a former HSBC employee, the employee got sentenced to five years.

The judgment of the Swiss Federal Criminal Court in Bellinzona was issued on Friday due to industrial espionage. From further allegations, including breach of commercial confidentiality, the 43-year-old was acquitted. The former employees of HSBC Private Bank, a subsidiary of the British HSBC, had thousands of customer information leaked to the authorities in France. The Bank had spoken of theft and given the loss of data of up to 24,000 customers.

The process was determined by the question of whether the man was an honorable "whistleblower" or an unscrupulous con artist. Based on its data, many celebrities were advised as potential tax evaders in the focus of investigators worldwide. It could not be clearly demonstrated that for the transfer of stolen client data also money flowed.

As you could read above an employee has forwarded customer data to the authorities. Even forwarding data to the authorities is forbidden by law. Think now: Why someone should give you some data and go to jail for it or get high fined? Do you really think that you are more trustfull than government authorities? In this case you should stop taking drugs.

If you are writing into an email or a chat the lie that you had such a process already than you get classified from a real broker as a liar and you'll are getting no information about any available process. Making business is based on trust and nobody can build up trust with someone which is lying. You are even confirming in such a case that you don't have any skills for leading a center.

Fact is that you'll not find any inbound campaign because not one client will give you access to his data. The fines for breaking the data protection law are very high (U.S. $16,000 per record, Europe € 50,000 - € 58,000 per case). One famous case has been AT&T which has paid a fine of $25,000,000 for 280,000 stolen customer records during an outsourcing process. At this time the fines have been cheaper. So why should any client take the risk for getting fined? Normally a broker gets paid from the client who has hired him. As there is no client available the scammer has no other possibility to get money as by selling his dream campaigns to centers.

As you'll find in the social networks offers for non-voice processes and inbound campaigns only against a huge up-front fee is confirming already the scam. It does not make any difference how the fee is getting called. Every work, which is only available against a fee, is nothing else than a SCAM!!!

If you are getting scammed by someone with such or a similar process then you are guilty by yourself because you have been too lazy to inform yourself if the process is possible or not. Your own greed and laziness let you believe that the scammer is trustworthy. In this case you can complaint the scammer and your own stupidity.

If you don't believe the above than use Google and search for "Swissleaks".

 

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Fraud and Scam

U.S. FTC - The Federal Trade Commission - Illegal Robocalls
by Rudolf Faix Monday, August 31, 2015 7:44 AM

It is difficult for offshore call centers to provide their services by using a legal way. On one side they need to work lucrative on the other side they need to keep themselves on the law and government regulations of the destination country of their calls, what makes their work very difficult.

If you are watching the following video or read the transcript from the FTC attorney Kati Daffan, then you’ll get it that you are not allowed to greet the called one with a recording and if the center likes to sell something – what is in the most cases the reason for the call from an offshore call center – then the client of the center needs to have a written permission of their victims, which should get called.

The first problem with the greeting done by a life person can get easily handled by adjusting the dial system that every time is at least one free agent is available who can take the call immediately and greet the called one.

If the client provides calling data the second problem can get solved too. In respect to the data protection law is the client not allowed to provide more detailed information as can get found in a public phone directory. In any case should keep the center a copy of the data transmission or the email with the access to the data for having a proof. The center shall keep the proofs at least 10 years in evidence.

We can find the following explanations from the FTC attorney Kati Daffan about Robocalls at the homepage of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC):

Few things can be more annoying than answering the phone while you're in the middle of something — and then being greeted by a recording.

If you receive a robocall trying to sell you something (and you haven’t given the caller your written permission), it’s an illegal call. You should hang up. Then, file a complaint with the FTC and the National Do Not Call Registry.

Transcript from the video above:

If you have a telephone, robocalls may be ruining your day. I'm Kati Daffan, an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message instead of a live person, it's a robocall. If the recording is a sales message and you haven't given your written permission to get calls from the company on the other end, the call is illegal period.

So when you get an illegal robocall, here's what to do. Hang up the phone. Don't press one to speak to a live operator. And don't press any other number to get off the list. If you respond by pressing any number, it will probably just lead to more robocalls.

You might consider contacting your phone provider and asking them to block the number and whether they charge for that service. Remember that telemarketers change caller ID information easily and often. So it might not be worth paying a fee to block a number that will change.

Finally, contact the FTC to report your experience. You can do that online at ftc.gov or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP. To learn more about illegal robocalls and what the FTC is doing to stop them, visit ftc.gov/robocalls. That's ftc.gov/robocalls.

Source: The Federal Trade Commission

Another video from the FTC attorney Kati Daffan give some more information:

Transcript of the video above:

If you have a telephone, it probably seems like illegal robo calls are out of control. I'm Kati Daffan, an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission. If you pick up the phone, and hear a recorded message instead of a live person, that's a robocall.

Consumers are getting more and more robo calls, and they are not happy about it. As the number of calls has multiplied, the number of complaints has, too. The reason for the spike in robo calls has to do with technology. Companies are using auto dialers, that can send out thousands of phone calls every minute, for an incredibly low cost.

What's important is that the companies that use this technology don't bother to screen for the numbers on the National Do Not Call Registry. If a company doesn't care about obeying the law, you can be sure they're trying to scam you. You've probably gotten robo calls about candidates running for office, or charities asking for donations. These robo calls are allowed. But any robo call that's trying to sell you something probably is illegal, unless you've given your written permission to get calls from that company.

The FTC has stopped billions, yes billions, of robo calls in the last two years. Tracing these calls is a tough job, and there are a few reasons for that. One, is that many different companies use the same, or very similar, recorded messages. Another, is that they fake the caller ID information that you see on your phone. That's called caller ID spoofing, and new technology makes it very easy to do. And the third, is that the robo callers often place the calls through internet technology, that hides their location.

At the FTC, we're continuing our aggressive enforcement efforts. And we're also looking for innovative, technological solutions to the robo call problem. For more information, please visit ftc.gov/robocalls. That's ftc.gov/robocalls.

Source: The Federal Trade Commission

Don’t forget that the fines in the U.S. are very high. Everybody who needs to defend himself in front of the law court will think first about himself and will very fast forget his given promises only for the reason that the fine will be a little bit less drastically. Your client will be coming first into the focus of the investigators, because you are selling his products. So your client or broker will in the best case provide the contact details of his partner in crime to the state attorney for getting a better deal for his own judgement. He will even try to make you alone guilty for his own fails. You need to have in this case proofs for your own protection and defense.

 

The scam with premium phone numbers
by Rudolf Faix Sunday, August 16, 2015 6:39 AM

CoinsPremium-rate telephone numbers are telephone numbers for telephone calls during which certain services are provided, and for which prices higher than normal are charged. Unlike a normal call, part of the call charge is paid to the service provider, thus enabling businesses to be funded via the calls. While the billing is different, calls are usually routed the same way they are for a toll-free telephone number, being anywhere despite the area code used. These telephone numbers are usually allocated from a national telephone numbering plan in such a way that they are easily distinguished from other numbers. Telephone companies typically offer blocking services to allow telephone customers to prevent access to these number ranges from their telephones. In some jurisdictions, telephone companies are required by law to offer such blocking.

Adult chat lines (phone sex) and tech support are a very common use of premium-rate numbers. Other services include directory enquiries, weather forecasts, competitions and voting (especially relating to television shows). Diplomatic services, such as the US embassy in London or the UK Embassy in Washington, have also charged premium rates for calls from the general public.

In many European countries, for example France, Germany and the United Kingdom, it is common for organisations to operate customer service lines on premium-rate numbers using prefixes that fall outside the scope of the country's premium-rate number regulations. Therefore, in contrast to North America where customer service numbers are typically free of charge to the caller, consumers in Europe often pay a premium above the cost of a normal telephone call.

Computer criminals have used premium-rate numbers to defraud unsuspecting Internet users. One scheme involved inducing users to download a program known as a dialer that surreptitiously dialed a premium-rate number, accumulating charges on the user's phone bill without their knowledge. Another now-uncommon premium-rate scam involves television programming that induces young children to dial the number, banking on the notion that they will be unaware of the charges that will be incurred. One variant, targeted at children too young to dial a number, enticed children to hold the phone up to the television set while the DTMF tones of the number were played. This type of scam was especially popular in the late '80s to early '90s in the United States before tougher regulations on the 900 number business forced many of these businesses to close.

Premium phone numbers are normally only reachable from inside the same country. The phone regulatory offices are not allowing routing premium phone numbers international. Calling a premium phone number has a fixed price per minute or per call and are excluded from the pricing of the standard dial plan.

Don't forget that you don't need some call center only for calling numbers and keep the line open. Such a job can be easily done by a phone system itself. You only need to prepare your prdeictive dialer for such a job.

For all this reasons not one VoIP provider lets you dialing premium numbers. All these offers for call center are nothing else than SCAM.

 

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Fraud and Scam

Email Job Scam: JOB OPENING AT TOTAL OIL AND GAS (USA)
by Rudolf Faix Thursday, July 2, 2015 4:33 AM

Comic: Identity Theft - Yes, it could happen to youYou can be sure that a company like Total - Oil, Natural Gas and Solar Energy will never use a gmail address or will send out some spam with job offerings. If you like to get a job at Total - Oil, Natural Gas and Solar Energy then simple visit the job offers at their homepage.

The spam email, which got sent out:

From: TOTAL OIL & GAS (USA) [mailto:ba.affandhie@gmail.com
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 5:05 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: JOB OPENING AT TOTAL OIL AND GAS(USA)

 

Dear Job Seeker.

 

With the mandate to recruit expatriate services employees for TOTAL OIL & GAS, We intend to invite prime experienced

individuals/expatriates capable of rendering expertise services in USA.

This is to inform all Interested Expatriates/candidate should forward his/her CV/Resume to

(maryphills@totaloilandgas.esy.es)

We had to change our email address due to some technical problems, so you are now adviced to furnish your CV/RESUME to the given mail id.

 

HR MANAGER

MARY PHILLS

TOTAL OIL & GAS

Take a look at the email address where you shall send your cv: maryphills@totaloilandgas.esy.es

esy.es is a free hosting provider with a very bad reputation for the scam, which is coming from there. totaloilandgas is nothing else than a subdomain, which is a part of esy.es. You can take a look at the reputation from esy.es at Web of Trust.

You can be sure that big companies have their own human resource department and use even job offers for their promotion. For this they will use their company email and will avoid some free services which can destroy their reputation.

Check every time from where the email is coming, search the company by using your favorite search engine and get in contact with them by using an email address provided at their homepage. CV's can get used for identity theft.

 

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Fraud and Scam

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I'm since more then 35 years in the computer business (programming and technical support) and using the Internet since it has started. Since 2002 I'm programming solutions for Asterisk and since 2004 I'm in the call center industry.

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